A header image for a how-to article explaining how to use Prodigy Math for intervention.

3 Steps to Use Prodigy as an RTI Tool

Using a digital tool for Response to Intervention (RTI) gives you another avenue to address your students’ trouble spots and skill deficits, while collecting data and engaging them.

You can use Prodigy to deliver specific content to certain students and check their progress on a cyclical basis:

An image shows the three-step for using Prodigy Math Game for intervention: Setting in-game content, checking reports and scaffolding.

If you want to use Prodigy as a First Tier RTI tool check out this video:

If you want to use Prodigy as a Second Tier RTI Tool check out this video:

Here are three steps to use Prodigy as an RTI tool for math:

1. Use your Planner tool to set specific Plans or Assignments

Visit the Prodigy website and click Login in the top-right corner.

Select a classroom, and go to the Planner tool.

 

A screenshot showing how teachers can access their Planner tool in Prodigy.
You can find the Planner tool at the left of your screen on desktop. If you’re using a mobile device, it’s at the bottom.

 

At the top of your screen, click the green Create button.

 

A screenshot showing teachers how to create an Assignment in their Prodigy accounts

 

Create either a:

  • Plan — Within a custom timeframe, you can align in-game content with curriculum-aligned domains and standards across grade levels. This option helps address class-wide trouble spots as a first-tier RTI strategy.
  • Assignment — You determine the number of questions per domain and strand across grade levels, as well as which students receive the in-game assignment itself. This option helps engage individual students with unique trouble spots as a second-tier RTI strategy.

Choose an option, following on-screen prompts to deliver relevant content.

2. Check your Student Comprehension report

As students play Prodigy, the Student Comprehension report captures their work and progress across domains and strands.

In your Prodigy classroom, go to the Reports tool.

 

A picture of where teachers can find the Reports feature within the Prodigy Game teacher account.
You can find the Reports tool at the left of your screen on desktop. If you’re using a mobile device, it’s at the bottom.

 

Click on the Student Comprehension report.

Select a:

  • Student
  • Date range
  • Grade level, keeping in mind a Plan can span grade levels

 

A gif showing how to use the comprehension report in the Prodigy Math Game teacher account.

 

Within the grade drop-down menu, find the domain and strand matching your Plan or Assignment.

 

A picture of Prodigy's student comprehension report for teachers, which showcases how many questions students answer related to a domain and stand.
Click to enlarge.

 

You’ll see how long the student spent practicing, as well as how many questions he or she answered correctly.

3. Repeat, providing scaffolding as needed

You’ll know to give in-person scaffolding based on the Comprehension Report.

If so, you can return to your Planner to reinforce the given skills afterwards. If not, use your Planner to concentrate on a different domain or strand.

The Comprehension Report will keep tracking student activity, continually informing your RTI strategy!

 


>>To start using Prodigy for Response to Intervention (RTI), create or log in to your teacher account 👇

 

 

>>For more information about your Planner tool, visit our teacher support article.

>>And for more information about Reports, visit this teacher support article.

Marcus Guido

Marcus is Prodigy's product marketing lead.

8 thoughts on “3 Steps to Use Prodigy as an RTI Tool

  1. We have a 45 minute WIN ( What I Need) class in the morning. I have been using Prodigy with my small group to help them build on their skills that have gaps. They seem to be building a little confidence now. I wish I could do this with all my students that have gaps.

  2. We have a 30 minute RTI period everyday. I have students complete the placement test at the beginning of every year so they can work at their level and see progress as the year goes by.

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